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How to Choose a Plastics Granulator: A Guide Granulation and reduction of size keeps increasing in significance every day. And a granulator is a machine that cuts and reduces the size of scrap plastic into smaller granules for easier management. The generated granules could then be utilized in other plastic manufacturing or sold in the open market. You want to identify the right machine when searching for a granulator to help manage material costs more efficiently, produce recycled materials, and improve the bottom line. Here are some essential considerations in the selection of a granulator for chopping scrap plastics:
On Equipment: My Experience Explained
Intended Use
On Equipment: My Experience Explained
The first thing that should come to your mind when selecting the appropriate granulating machine is your intended application. Step one, understand the material along the lines of the amount of it you want cut into granules as well as how big the scrap plastics are. It’s necessary that you determine the physical size and shapes of these parts. Next, focus on the material itself. Different materials don’t have the same reactions; for example PVC and glass filled polymers have different characteristics from polypropylene. And if you’re using several feed streams, it helps to work out percentages for them. In the event you handle 95% sprues and runners, and purgings occasionally, you’re better off dedicating a solution to sprues and runners while identifying a disparate tool for the purge. As far as granulation is concerned, there’s barely a single system that’s seamlessly all in one, and any consistent use of a single solution for all solutions may result in effective operations and higher costs over the long term. On the other hand, taking into account all pertinent aspects of intended use and materials becomes crucial in the identification of the ideal rotor type, chamber size, and capabilities for horsepower necessary to for flawless execution of the task. Granulator Components The rotor is one of the most important granulator parts to consider when buying your machine. You may prefer an open rotor for processing fragments with slim walls. The open design provides for streamlined flow of materials. The best for large, thick scraps is a closed rotor design, while a staggered rotor, which has more cuts for each revolution, is a hybrid of the other two designs. It may also help to look at the mechanisms between the fly knife and bed knife as horsepower preferences may be affected. Counterbalancing the two knives generates a scissor cut. You may have a granulator with two bed knives, although a machine can sport three or four to boost its cutting function. Likewise, take chamber size and shape into account as these do impact the size of the chunk the knives can bite each turn.